Top 4 Famous Paintings of The Night Sky

Since the ancient times, humanity has been fascinated by the night sky full of stars. We’ve been excited by the mystery and limitlessness of this distant beautiful world sparkling far beyond our reach. These feelings found their expression in science, technology, literature and of course art. A vast number of artists, impressed by the charm of the dark time, created wonderful starlight night paintings that keep amazing us even though some of them were born centuries ago. Here are the most famous nocturnal canvases you should be aware of.

1. “The Great Comet of 1680 Over Rotterdam” by Lieve Verschuier, 1680.

The painting shows one of the most unbelievable phenomena – the arrival of a comet in the 17th century. The light of the comet was so bright that it was reputedly visible even during the day. We can only imagine how people shown in the picture were excited and at the same time scared by this spectacular sight.

2. “Starry Night Over the Rhone” by Vincent van Gogh, 1888.

Works by Van Gogh are some of the best-known paintings dedicated to the beauty of the night sky. Depicting a night river with a shimmering panorama of the city on the other shore and huge swirling stars overhead, this canvas will strike you with vibrant colors, amazing technique and romantic mood.

3. “Starry Night” by Edvard Munch, 1893.

Creating his works, Munch tried to convey the unfathomable mystery of the night. Unlike Van Gogh, he represents it in deep dark colors, which makes the painting quite frightening but at the same time attractive.

4. “Starlight Night” by Georgia O’Keeffe, 1917.

This unexpected and thought-provoking canvas looks more like a geometric abstraction than a landscape. The inky dark background representing the night sky is filled with bright dots placed at even intervals that symbolize burning stars. Georgia claims she pictured the West’s crystal-clear, dark night skies.

Nevertheless, with the coming of civilization, more and more people have forgotten about the beauty of the night sky outshined by the street lights and polluted by chemical waste. Today, very few of us pay attention to the stars over our heads. However, there are artists ready to remind us about it.

5 Completely Bizarre Fashion Trends

Gluing A Uni-brow On Your Head

In ancient Greece, there was nothing more unattractive than a woman with two clearly separated eyebrows on her head. If a woman wanted to show complexity and beauty, she needed a long, black, caterpillar-like line of hair widening across her brow.

According to early Greeks, unibrows were the sexiest decoration that a woman could attire. Women wiped black powder on the hair between their eyebrows to make it stand out and look as full as possible.

If a girl was unsuccessful enough to be born without any hair between her eyes, she would make do. Some would rub black dust between their brows. Others coloured goat hair black, wiped some tree resin on the back, and attached it to their heads.

0.6 Meters (2 Ft) Tall High Heels

In the mid Ages, Florence was the style capital of the world. There, the ladies pulled out every stop to make sure that they looked good. No trend, however, compared to the self-respect and beauty of wearing chopines, platform shoes with huge wooden heels that were occasionally more than 0.6 meters (2 ft) tall.

The appearance became so popular that it spread to men, too. Since people were basically walking on stilts, getting around was pretty hard. But Florence’s fashionistas made do by hobbling with canes.

Most people outside of Florence thought that the look was bizarre. Some even named it “sinfully vain.” The church, though, begrudgingly accepted it. At the very least, they accepted that wearing chopines kept women from dancing-and that, after all, was the worst sin of all.

Dropping Poison In Your Eyes

Nightshade is one of the most poisonous plants in the world. If you drop a little of its poison into someone’s drink, you can send them directly into a coma. If you add a little further, you can kill them. In Renaissance Italy, though, women poured it straight into their eyes.

The Italians called it belladonna (“the beautiful lady”) because a drop of poison in your eyes would widen your pupils, making it look like you were permanently awakened.

It also blurred your vision and faster your heart rate. If you used too much of it, you can go blind. Still, that was a small price to pay to look good.

Socks With Sandals

Ancient Rome brought us the most bizarre fashion of all: socks with sandals. Despite the prohibitions of modern life, our earlier families went out confidently and proudly wearing open-toe sandals with socks under.

This isn’t something we learned easily. It took ages of work by many teams of archaeologists and historians, all dedicated toward finally determining the kind of footwear combinations that the Romans used. Now we finally have “unequivocal evidence” that they wore socks under their sandals.

The socks were spun from wool and went all the way up to the lap. Then the Romans would combine the look with open-toe sandals. Apparently, wearing sandals without socks is a comparatively new miracle.

Blackening Your Teeth

Recently, women in Japan took dentistry in a different way. They decided that tooth decay is one of the best looks out there. So if a woman’s teeth weren’t dropping out on their own, she’d paint them black.

Japanese women have been blackening their teeth for so long that we aren’t sure when or why they started doing it. At the very least, by about AD 900, women were painting their teeth black. Shortly after, men started doing it, too.

The Japanese mixed hot water, sake, and red-hot iron in a pot and let it sit for five days. A black sum would rise to the top, which they would pickle off and scrub on their teeth.